Deciding How to Decide
and Why it Matters (A lot) for Your Company’s Culture.

By Levi Nieminen, PhD, Director of Research & Senior Consultant

In this article, I describe the strong ties between decision making processes in organizations and people’s experience of the culture, pointing out a number of the common challenges. I then discuss how to introduce a common language around decision making and weave it deep into the fabric of organizations.

When you get down far enough into the “mud” of culture in organizations, one of the things that almost always winds up on the shovel is decision making. People aren’t involved in the decisions that impact them. Their input is not sought out, or when it is, it’s not really valued. They don’t know why certain decisions were made. And they never heard back from the decision makers afterwards… the list goes on.

When these behaviors are common enough, people slog along carrying high levels of frustration with them, and their organizations suffer too because decision making is neither as effective nor as efficient as it could be. When employees describe the culture, they point out how their bosses are overbearing micromanagers who have to make every decision, no matter how small, e.g., “We can’t get anything done without getting their approval.”

Vice versa, when managers describe the culture, they talk about employees whose desire for authority exceeds both their capabilities and their interest in the additional accountability that comes with it, e.g., “Things would grind to a halt if we had to ask for their opinion on every decision that comes across our desks.” You get the picture: low empowerment, low transparency, low trust.

It’s interesting to note, however, that in these same organizations, it’s also rare to find managers or employees who aren’t genuinely interested in reshaping these cultural dynamics and finding a healthy balance. Generally speaking, managers don’t like micromanaging, and employees aren’t seeking unfettered authority. It’s less that they lack a want for change and more that they get stalled out in the how. Their internal debate is entrenched in a fruitless comparison of two equally unattractive options: Micromanagement or unfettered authority? The distance between these poles looks like a huge leap of faith and an above-average chance to go splat if they do jump.

A language for decision making processes

When you dig deeper, one of the root causes you’ll find is that many organizations (perhaps most) do not engage in explicit discussions about how decisions are madei.e., the decision process. Instead, they take steps ahead using a fuzzy set of assumptions about how things are likely to play out, each person carrying a unique view of the past and unique hopes for what will be different this time, much or all of it unstated to each other.

And it’s generally true, as it is here, that we don’t talk about the things for which we lack the language. On this point, what can be very helpful is to introduce a framework for talking about different ways to make a decision so that people can outline and consider some basic options. And if the framework is simple enough–and simplicity is beauty here–people can hold it in their minds and call on it in the moment. This allows the decision process to become an explicit point of discussion with a more rational and transparent basis for choosing.

The framework I describe in this article is not my original work. It’s an ‘oldie but a goodie’ that can be traced all the way back to Vroom and Yetton’s seminal research on decision making styles in the 1970s.[1] They described five main styles and laid out the criteria and corresponding questions that should lead to a rational choice of one over the other. Organizational psychologist, Bruce Gibb, introduced me to an adapted version of the Vroom and Yetton framework, where he added delegation as an additional decision style and revised some of the language. This is my further simplification of those frameworks, where I differentiate four basic decision processes:

  • An authoritative process is when one person makes a decision with little input or assistance from others. If they do seek input it’s usually in the form of requesting bits of information from others while providing minimal context about the decision to be made. The process of weighing the facts and making the decision is approached almost entirely as a one-person-job.
  • In a consultative process, one person retains ultimate decision authority but seeks others’ participation in getting to a decision. They share the full context and then invite others to take an active problem solving role. They might ask outright what others think should be done before ultimately making and communicating a decision.
  • In a group process, one person facilitates a group of people to make the decision. The group weighs the facts, fully debates the pros and cons of each option, and seeks to build consensus through the dialogue. If no clear consensus emerges, the group may choose to vote on it or find a path forward via other means (e.g., ceding the decision to a subgroup, etc.).
  • Finally, one person can delegate to another, who then moves the decision forward using an authoritative, consultative, or group process as described above. The person in a position to delegate might provide some guidance on how to proceed at the outset of the process and offer some ongoing counsel, however, without reclaiming the lead role in advancing the decision process.

[1] See Vroom and Yetton’s seminal article, “A New Look at Managerial Decision Making,” published in Organizational Dynamics, (Vol. 1, No. 4, 1973).

Right about now, you’re likely thinking a few things. One is about all the nuances and exceptions to these four, and of course, that’s true. But the point is that these are the basics, the building blocks by which many if not most decisions are fundamentally made. And if groups can learn these four and agree on what they basically look like, then they have a basis for asking the all-important question: How are we going to make this decision? And furthermore, decisions that start out as a consultative process can turn into a group process and have sub-decisions that are made on an authoritative basis, and so on. But at any given point, the people involved can pull out the building blocks and have a reference point to make sense of where they are and where they’ll go next.

A second thing you might be thinking is how this framework can possibly help steer some control from the hands of the micro-manager. Isn’t the problem that these people make authoritative decisions and conclude in their own minds that it’s working great? The key here is to not allow the thought process to stay inside minds but to bring it out into the open air. An authoritative decision that makes sense to several people looks really different and has a very different reception than an authoritative decision that makes sense only to one person. Dialogue is the difference. However, for it to be productive dialogue there needs to be a common logic or “mental model” within the group for deciding how to decide.

Deciding how to decide

In my opinion, Vroom and Yetton’s original work is too complex and unwieldy to be easily accessible and useful in the crucial “little moments” that determine whether things proceed this way or that way. In place of their original decision tree, I’ve substituted a set of heuristics that describe a rational basis for preferring one decision process over the others, or as Gibb says, “Deciding how to decide.”

Within these heuristics, four criteria are defined so that their relative importance can be weighed accordingly in each situation.

  • Prefer an authoritative process when the person has all of the necessary information, it’s a routine decision, the group’s acceptance is either assured or relatively unimportant, and efficiency is paramount.

> Acceptance is the level of “buy-in” and support needed from those who will implement, follow, or abide by the decision.

> Efficiency is the speed at which the decision can be made.

  • Prefer a consultative process when the person does not have all of the necessary information but knows how to approach the problem solving aspect, needs to build a certain level of group acceptance, and when quality is prioritized over efficiency.

> Quality is the importance assigned to making the best possible decision because the outcome will be highly consequential or highly visible.

  • Prefer a group process when the person does not have all of the necessary information, does not know how best to approach the problem solving aspect and therein needs the brainpower of a group, and where that same group’s acceptance is paramount.
  • Finally, prefer delegation when the person judges another as sufficiently capable to lead the decision process, is in a position to provide the necessary level of guidance and support, and when development can take priority.

> Development is the degree to which leading the process is a valuable growth opportunity.

In general terms, when you follow these heuristics, they prime an important thought process about what matters most (i.e., the “criteria”), and therefore, what process makes the most sense in the situation. Is it – Making a quick decision? Getting it right? Bringing others along? Or creating a development opportunity? The answer is situational.

You’ll also note that applying this framework helps to address the “who question” but does so by walking backward from an analysis of the situation and criteria. When groups enter the dialogue focused on who gets to make the decision, it has a way of priming unhelpful notions of turf and positional power. In contrast, focusing the dialogue on how the decision should be made has a way of opening up the right questions at the right time about roles, expertise, access to information, key influencers, and so on. In other words, clarifying process usually helps to sort out questions about who best to involve and how.

Creating the space for dialogue

Learning the framework is one thing and practicing it is something entirely different. An important aspect of getting it into daily practice is creating the space for routine dialogue. In my experience, the best way to learn the framework is to use it to analyze some specific decision examples from the past. The facilitator might ask the group: Describe a decision that wasn’t as effective as you would like, either because there was confusion, it was too slow, people didn’t support it, etc. What process was used and what process might have worked better?

It’s not uncommon in these discussions to unearth divergent descriptions of what happened and why, even down to some of the very basics. The boss thought he had delegated it. The group thought it was going to be a democratic process. Two executives each thought the other ultimately had made the decision. In each case, a better word for thought would be assumed. But making fun of the past isn’t the point. The key insights from these past examples should lead the group directly into a productive planning discussion about how future decisions will be made more effectively.

Giving people a set of questions they can use as prompts for productive dialogue is a second exercise that can help a lot. Well, not quite “giving” them. The group needs to articulate–for themselves–the questions they feel would improve decision making and then commit to using them in daily practice. Again, simple is good, and the closer in number to 7±2, the more likely people can hold them in their minds and call on them in the moment.

Here are some examples of good questions that can add depth to the thought process and dialogue about decisions:

  • Have the right people been consulted and/or involved?
  • On what data is the decision being made?
  • At what level of the organization should the decision be made?
  • Is there a policy or guidelines to reference? If not, will this decision create one?
  • Does the decision reflect and reinforce our values as an organization?
  • Have we closed the loop by communicating the ‘how-what-why’ after a decision was made?
  • How will we measure the impact of the decision over time?

Whether people perceive that it is safe (or not) to use the questions is everything, and has a lot to do with how leaders behave. Key signals from leadership that others will look for include (i) whether leaders demonstrate humility and ask others to challenge their assumptions and thinking and (ii) how leaders respond to the first few “challenges” that come their way.

Embedding the new behaviors

One yardstick for judging the success of a program architected on these principles is the extent to which new habits and routines emerge in place of the old ones. And killing the old ones dead won’t be easy. And so in closing, I’ll leave you with a few reflections about how to translate program learning into habits that embed deep and stick around.

Use a campaign of reminders. Keeping the program learnings and commitments top-of-mind for people is a big first hurdle. Artifacts such as posters, business cards, or decision making “playbooks” can help, particularly if they provide a quick reference to the stickiest parts of the program, such as “the questions.”

Meetings are another place for new routines and reminders. Meetings can start with a quick clarifier on what decisions will be made or discussed and how; they can be wrapped up by asking: Are we clear on what was decided – or – What next steps are needed for us to move to a decision?

Stay on top of the bad old habits. It can help a lot when groups talk about their biggest “watch-outs” and how they will raise awareness to the early signals that, “folks, we’re doing it again.” This is also where having a parallel track that supports individual awareness and growth is extremely important. In truth, this topic is deserving of its own blown-up article, and there are some really interesting ways to integrate things like personality assessment, feedback, and one-on-one coaching. But for now, let’s all agree (and then move on) that all the best programs can succumb to the re-emergence of the bad old habits, particularly when they re-emerge from the key influencers in the group.

Scaling the program from top to bottom. The long-term success of any one team, department, or division to shift its decision making behavior will be capped to a certain extent by whether the organization as a whole can make a similar shift over time, starting most immediately where there are strong interdependencies. This is most salient up and down the hierarchy, where executives need to role model the new behaviors and engage their direct reports in a process of “cascading” the key program elements down to their direct reports, and their direct reports, and so on. The key role for program facilitators here is to support this process and get everyone in the organization speaking the new language.

Levi Nieminen, PhD is the Director of Research and a Senior Consultant with Denison Consulting

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Empowers People
The individual helps to create an environment where individuals have authority, initiative, and ability to manage their own work. The individual has a sense of ownership and responsibility for the organization.

Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you with (or take the initiative to identify) a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles and strengthen your competencies.

• Include employees in the decision-making process, where possible, and discuss the reasoning behind certain decisions and actions as a team.

• Provide employees with a greater sense of autonomy or control in their job responsibilities and decisions.

• Create a supportive and safe environment where employees feel comfortable in having a voice and ask employees for their inputs and ideas.

• Encourage open communication with employees and listen to employee’s needs, desires, and career aspirations.

• Recognize and reward individuals and teams that take the initiative to solve a business challenge or obstacle.

• Empower employees by giving them the ability to “stop the line” if they see a quality or safety risk, and recognize and reward those who do.

• Give employees the opportunity to provide feedback and tailor their training curriculum to fit their interests and needs.

• Hold weekly “current affairs” meetings to provide regular updates and information to employees so that they can make more informed decisions.

• Ask employees to provide a list of responsibilities and decisions that they believe they should own and why. Afterward, engage employees in discussion to discuss the list, clarify what decisions they can make, those they can influence, and those that are beyond the scope of the employee’s responsibility.

• Provide employees with opportunities for additional responsibility and challenges at work to foster empowerment and development.

• Convey confidence in employees and voice your appreciation of employees.

Defines Strategic Direction & Intent
The individual communicates the organization’s overall strategies so that everyone can see the relationship between their work and the accomplishment of the work group or organization’s goals. S/he effectively implements short and long-term strategies to meet organizational goals.

Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Develop a 1-page document that includes the company mission, vision, and values, and the team’s goals – connecting them to the bigger picture. Share this document with your employees and discuss the connection between the mission, vision, and values, and the team’s goals.

• Adopt Denison’s Create-Communicate-Clarify-Reinforce model to ensure that vision and strategy move beyond the communication stage to enhanced ownership, with a clear demonstration of how they impact decisions.

• Develop a strategic roadmap for “winning” in the marketplace, highlighting growth, productivity and accountability, and for possible future situations, such as an acquisition or merger.

• Clarify and communicate five strategic priorities after conducting a needs assessment with external customers – priorities that help connect the internal actions to the customer wants and needs. This can also be done with internal customers.

• Hold “what-how-and-why” town hall, weekly, or one-on-one meetings with employees to build their understanding of the company direction. Encourage employees to ask questions, gain greater clarity about the priorities and direction, and how they affect their work. Ask for input and feedback from employees.

• Hold leadership-led strategy workshops, bringing all managers together to discuss and understand each division’s strategy and goals, and how they align to support the company vision and strategy.

• Create “strategic thinking” teams to engage staff in dialog about institutional priorities and future opportunities.

• Create transparency and discuss leadership long-range strategic planning process. Invite employees to voice their input regarding the planning process.

Creates Shared Vision
The leader helps create a shared view of a desired future state for his/her organizational unit. S/he inspires others with this vision, translates it into everyday activities, and engages others to ensure buy-in and commitment.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Place posters of the company mission and vision in highly trafficked areas to remind employees of the organization’s mission and vision.

• Make the mission and vision key components of your employee onboarding process.

• Start important meetings with a reminder of the vision of the company, why it is important, and how the meeting relates to the vision.

• Ask employees to identify what the vision means to him/her and what he/she could do to make the vision come to life.

• Link discussions about the strategy, goals, and daily tasks directly back to the vision, to create line-of-sight between the near- and long-term priorities.

• Check-in with employees on the progress of the goal to reach or maintain the mission and vision. Ask for input from employees in what can be done to accelerate progress.

• As a leader, elude more clarity and excitement about the vision, including your stories of success and progress.

• As a leader, demonstrate your own passion about the work of the company and share stories of how your passion has translated into your work.

• Use social media, case studies, and internal communication vehicles to highlight examples of the company, demonstrating the mission and vision.

Promotes Organizational Learning
The individual leader encourages innovation, risk taking, and continuous improvement. Sees mistakes as opportunities for gaining knowledge and developing capabilities.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Hire talent that brings a unique set of experiences that are new to the organization and allow them to promote a different way of thinking.

• Send employees into the field/customer site to observe their designs and products in use, and bring that knowledge back for process design or improvement.

• Create a “knowledge channel” to facilitate employees sharing information, stories and best practices. This could be monthly learning circles, profession-specific meetings, internal social media, internal shared drives, emails etc.

• Promote AAR’s (After Action Reviews) or “Lessons Learned” events to deconstruct an activity and share what was learned – capturing the positive and negative in an effort to inform future actions.

• Utilize Action Learning methodologies to not only broaden the team participating in problem-solving, but also to discuss what the team is learning about the way they solve problems.

• Implement “Fu Pan” (replaying the chess board), a process that promotes revisiting a set of actions for evaluating and improvement of work quality and speed.

• Allocate time for learning and innovation, making them an expected component of an employee’s job.

Emphasizes Customer Focus
The individual is driven to clearly understand the present and future needs of the customer, seeks ongoing input from the customer, continuously strives to improve customer service, and ensures that all employees are driven by a concern to satisfy the customer.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Create customer personas to help the team better understand customer (internal or external) wants and needs.

• Create a program or workshop to “walk a mile in the customer’s shoes” and collect customer stories that are then shared within the organization.

• Have a recognition program that is based on exceptional customer service.

• Start every meeting with a customer story or update to reinforce the importance of the customer.

• Conduct customer satisfaction surveys and require corrective actions for any teams that fall below a targeted percent satisfaction.

• Use stories and examples to encourage team to challenge customers when it is in their (and/or the organization’s) best interests to do things differently from their expectations

• Share/cascade examples of customer expectations to the team.

• Interview customers to get a clear picture of their expectations and feedback on the current service/deliverables.

• Do periodic check-ins with the customer and show visible course-correction, when needed.

Builds Team Orientation
The individual manager places value on employees working cooperatively toward common goals and often relies on team effort to get work done. S/he helps establish a sense of mutual accountability for the accomplishment of goals.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Embrace the differences between team members and play to each team member’s individual strengths.

• Encourage trust, communication, cooperation, transparency, and information sharing among team members.

• Create a supportive and safe environment where team members can discuss issues within the team, including differences in personality styles, decision-making approaches, conflict resolution preferences, and so on.

• Ask for information and formal feedback, and allow team to offer innovative solutions to critical business needs.

• Recognize and reward “winning” solutions, but remember to convey appreciation for all solutions.

• Clearly define the roles and responsibilities as well as the values and goals for each team. Have each team provide input regarding the values and goals for their team.

• Use an “open-office” working environment and instant messaging applications (for remote employees) in order to encourage more collaboration and communication.

• Promote social activities that allow for the building of stronger working relationships and fostering team spirit (volunteer work, sporting events, team competitions, etc.).

• Select a team-building framework (for example, the 5 Dysfunctions of a Team) and use that framework for a team assessment and improvement.

Defines Goals & Objectives
The individual encourages high employee accountability in setting and accomplishing organizational goals. S/he communicates a clear set of goals and objectives that can be linked to the mission, vision, and strategy of the work group or organization.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Utilize a specific framework for goal setting (SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timely).

• Set clear, high but attainable goals for individuals and teams. Develop these goals with the individual or team.

• Split large or “big picture” goals into smaller attainable goals. Communicate how these small goals will eventually help accomplish the larger goal.

• Adopt a performance management process that includes feedback and dialogue about progress towards individual and team goals. Feedback should not be limited to meetings but should be given at every opportunity.

• Recognize and reward employees and teams when goals are reached and work together to set additional high but attainable goals.

• Give a quarterly award for employees and teams based on measurable contributions to goals. Also, highlight contributions employees and teams made that contributed towards a goal, even if that goal was not met.

• Develop a set of clear behavioral objectives that reinforces how work needs to get done in order to support shifts in the strategy. Ask for input and feedback from employees regarding this.

• Implement the use of scorecards to increase transparency and accountability regarding critical KPIs. Be sure to communicate whether scorecards will be taken into account during performance appraisals.

• Adopt several “big picture” goals that promote cross-functional coordination in order to achieve those goals.

• Open meetings with progress updates on team goals to keep them top-of-mind and relevant to leaders from across the organization.

Creates Change
The individual knows the organizational environment, quickly reacts to current trends, and anticipates future changes. S/he continuously creates adaptive and innovative ways to meet changing needs.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Identify key stakeholders when implementing changes to proactively engage those stakeholders throughout the change process.

• Use communication with the team at various points in time to create excitement, openness and readiness to change.

• Volunteer to be a change agent for organizational or cross-team initiatives to design and/or deploy new initiatives.

• Create sub-teams to assess and support change readiness for new organizational initiatives rollout – using sub-teams who can later support their colleagues in adopting the changes.

• Develop or cascade clear messages regarding organizational changes that reinforce why the change is important and how it will move the organization forward.

• Implement lean principles and processes to involve employees in redesigning efficient work processes.

• Create communication plan for change to cascade message effectively starting from direct reports to the broader team.

• For organizational changes, demonstrate support for the change through communication and actions.

• Use the opportunity to coach employees through the change.

• Engage with and provide support to the project team managing the change.

• Identify and manage resistance and create a plan to address it.

• Re-allocate resources and accountabilities, if needed, to better meet customer needs.

Develops Organizational Capability
The individual manager continually focuses on the development of skills and knowledge to meet ongoing business needs. S/he knows how to effectively utilize the diversity in the work force.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Conduct developmental and professional training for employees that includes 360-degree feedback.

• Provide coaching and mentorship for employees’ personal and professional development.

• Create a learning center (e.g., folder) with relevant resources to allow for employee self-directed learning and development. Encourage employees to share and add resources to the folder.

• Develop individual development plans with employees.

• Schedule weekly and/or monthly one-on-one meetings with employees or teams to discuss progress towards organizational and professional goals.

• Create an explicit map of career paths and the competencies needed to move along those paths.

• Discuss with employees their current career path standing and what needs to be done to move their career forward. Identify any high potential employees.

• Review the talent strategy on a regular basis to support the evolving needs of the business.

• Provide employees the opportunity to work on “stretch-assignments” in an effort to build additional skills while working on interesting projects.

• Cross-train employees to broaden skill set, increase department collaboration, and enhance organizational efficiency.

• Require all leaders to dedicate at least 10% of their time to professional development for themselves and those who report to them.

Manages Coordination & Integration
The individual ensures that different functions or units of the work group or organization are able to work together well to achieve common goals. S/he establishes necessary contacts and coordinates resources in other groups to prevent organizational boundaries from interfering with getting work done.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Conduct facilitated cross-functional “give-get” sessions to clarify interdependencies and expectations for working across teams and functions.

• Identify the strategies and goals that require cross-organizational execution to deliver, and clarify the expectations for how different groups need to work together to meet those goals.

• Create job shadowing or rotation programs to pair up functional counterparts across divisions.

• Hold routine coordination meetings with critical external vendors and suppliers to ensure that they understand your company’s needs and expectations.

• Map out your key stakeholders across groups and rate the overall effectiveness of those working relationships.

• Create stand-up cross-functional teams to study complex issues and problems that require a “big picture” perspective, then recommend integrated solutions.

• Hold “brown bag” sessions where employees can hear what others in the group are working on, learn about problems they are trying to solve, and hear success stories. This increases awareness of the broader group activities and provides a platform for sharing what is going on outside of one’s own immediate team.

• Conduct an organization network analysis (using survey or current digital data) to understand patterns around communication and information sharing. Take actions to address issues emerging from the analysis.

• Conduct a team workshop to identify areas for improvement in the coordination and integration competency - Link.

• Reward behaviors that exemplify good coordination efforts.

• Communicate examples of collaboration and how it impacts better business results.

Works to Reach Agreement
The individual helps to reconcile differences when they occur by actively promoting constructive discussion of conflicting ideas, incorporating diverse points of view into decisions, and working toward win-win solutions.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Train employees on skills for having honest, crucial conversations.

• Institute “direct with respect” as an expectation for managers to engage in candid feedback and performance discussions.

• Adopt a decision-making model that utilizes prioritization and risk tools to promote more thoughtful, yet expedited, decisions.

• Create a clear approach for escalation of issues – with specific directions regarding whom to engage with and when.

• Adopt a RACI approach (Responsible-Accountable-Consulted-Informed) to determine ownership and influence over decisions.

• Set the tone on how diversity in thoughts and ideas can help to make better decisions. Introspect on own biases and make effort to overcome those.

• Be an ‘active’ listener (by giving undivided attention and acknowledging the message).

• Manage conflict at work thoughtfully and respectfully by ensuring privacy of employees, learning about the complete picture, and enabling objective decision-making.

• Promote and leverage ‘healthy’ conflict related to work related tasks through structured discussions (facilitated group meetings, brainstorming, etc.).

Defines Core Values
The individual communicates and lives by a set of nonnegotiable core values. S/he helps to define the work group or organization’s culture, values, and ethics; and helps employees learn to apply the organization’s values when dealing with customers, stakeholders, and other employees.
Self-Directed Learning:
Learning On-The-Job:
Social Learning:

1:1 Mentoring
Identify or ask your manager to match you with an executive mentor or a peer mentor based on your action plan focus area.

Group Mentoring
Join or create a group of 4-6 peer leaders who engage a senior mentor and meet as a group once or twice a month to discuss various topics and do structured group activities. Group mentoring combines senior and peer mentoring, as mentees learn from both the mentor and each other.

Training-Based Mentoring
Join a training program that matches you (or take the initiative to identify a mentor) with a mentor based on the specific skills taught in the training program.

Community of Learning: In-Person
Community or learning (often called “learning circles” is a great way to network and learn from peers and leaders for a common area of interest (management excellence). Join or start a group of employees who are interested in strengthening a particular competency. Identify specific topics, format (talk, panel, discussion, etc.) and meet periodically.

Community of Learning: Virtual
Similar in concept to “In Person” community of learning, except that where in person interaction is impractical or impossible due to different geographic locations. Instead, members use electronic methods such as email, instant messaging, and video conferencing. Join or start a community of learning that is virtual and build your global network and expertise.

Coaching
Identify a professional coach to help you improve, grow, and develop skills to overcome obstacles strengthen your competencies.

• Establish core values and engage team in an exercise to discuss the behaviors that would be “in-bounds” or “out-of-bounds” in an effort to surface what the values look like “in action.”

• Incorporate the core values into the performance review process – indicating that how work gets done is as important as what gets done.

• Teammates agree to “donate to the bucket” for any behaviors that violate their values – allowing for a fun, yet practical, way to hold each other accountable.

• Recognize behaviors and actions that reflect a core value in-practice.

• Refer to the values as key decisions are made and describe how the values informed those decisions.

• Include an opportunity for employees to describe the ways in which the organization is “living the values” and where the organization is “falling short" as part of the annual culture assessment.

• Add a cultural component to the onboarding process to accelerate a new employee’s cultural awareness, including emphasis on the core values and the reason those values are important to the organization.

Understand Where Significant And Meaningful Differences In Culture, Module, And/Or Leadership Perceptions occur

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Understand where significant and meaningful differences in culture, module, and/or leadership perceptions occur

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Understand How Culture Relates to Outcomes and Where Action Can Be Focused to Impact Change in Outcomes of Interest

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Understand How Culture, Leadership, or Module Perceptions Link to KPIs and Where Action Can Be Focused to Improve Performance

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Understanding Culture Without a Survey; Diving Deeper Into Results to Determine Why You Received the Results that You Did

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Client Wants to Capture Specific Constructs of Interest that aren’t Included in Denison’s Tools and Models

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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A Given Organization is Unique, Working in a Niche Market that Differs from a Typical Organization

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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A Unique Construct is of Interest to a Client but is Not Captured by Denison’s Tools and Models

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Client Tools and Models have been used in the Past to Collect data on Employee Perceptions but are not Benchmarked

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Client Has Areas of Interest in Mind and Survey Items have been created to Measure those Constructs, but not with Expert Support

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Client does not want to Survey the Entire Organization, but rather Gather Data from a Subset of the Organization that Represents the Whole

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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A Deeper Understanding of Employee Experience Beyond the Theme Analysis Offered by the Text Analytics Tool

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Understand how Leadership and Culture Interact, and how One can be used to Support the Other

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s

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Do you want to understand how Leadership and Culture interact to drive outcomes, such as Modules, KPIs, and Custom Items?

Dan Denison sets the context for insights gained in work done with Waggl for Delta Dental of California, all for the goal of transforming employee engagement. As part of one of the nation’s largest dental benefits delivery systems, Delta Dental of California is on a journey to strengthen its culture and reinforce its values in support of its business objectives. Check out this Waggl webinar to hear from Victoria Hughes, Head of Talent Management, OE and Culture at Delta Dental. You’ll learn how Delta Dental used the combined strength of the Denison framework and Waggl’s crowdsourcing platform to generate increased understanding about company strategic direction and values across the workforce, and surfaced ideas that helped the business improve engagement and transparency. Interview with Alex McMullin, Waggl In April 2016, Denison Consulting and Waggl, Inc. announced a strategic partnership to bring the combined strengths of Denison’s world-class consulting and assessment tools and Waggl’s real-time, crowd-sourced pulse surveys to customers seeking to transform their organizational cultures. We met recently with Waggl’s Head of Account Management and Partnerships, Alex McMullin, and asked him to reflect on the growing partnership from a customer perspective and how this partnership can help organizations in drawing culture solutions from within, and across, the organization. Denison: From your perspective, what was the goal of linking Denison’s